Review: Assassin’s Creed Origins

assassins-creed-origins-cover

Title: Assassin’s Creed Origins

Developer: Ubisoft

Genre: Action-adventure, stealth

Playtime: 100 hours

My rating: 8/10

*SPOILER WARNING: I won’t spoil major plotlines, but I will be discussing some content and Aya’s role*

Well fellow Creedsmen, this one has been a long time coming, and I’m not just talking about the two-year hiatus since Syndicate. I’m talking about the four-year hiatus since Black Flag. We have been faithfully sitting on our hands, biding our time, waiting for Ubisoft to come back around to the good old days of Assassin’s Creed. And I’m so thrilled to say they have finally done it!

I want to describe Origins as the first truly open-world AC game, in the sense that this is a vast land including urban and rural locations that can all be accessed on virtual foot. I know Black Flag is open world, but locations are only accessible after sailing for vast distances on an ‘open’ sea. Not that I didn’t love the sailing, but there’s only so much interest at sea. And both Unity and Syndicate were entirely based in a single city, and in my book that doesn’t constitute a world. But in Origins, AC has finally begun to reach its potential.

Ancient Egypt is not only a beautiful world, but it is an extremely faithful one. Everything has been painstakingly recreated to be as realistic as it’s possible to get. The great pyramids are almost completely accurate in terms of their internal architecture, Alexandria is the centre of knowledge and culture that it really was and don’t get me started on the languages. Having a degree in linguistics, this is possibly the most thrilling aspect for me. They actually reconstructed Ancient Egyptian for this game. Reconstructing a language is no five-minute job. You have to study its modern-day descendants and work backwards to counteract all the changes that languages go through over hundreds or thousands of years. That is seriously impressive. And not only are the locals expressing the Ancient Egyptian equivalent of “He must be mad!” and “Sunday driver!”, but the Romans are speaking Latin – yes, actual Latin – and the Greeks are speaking Ancient Greek.

And I think that’s where the strengths of ACO lie. They have taken the tried and tested Assassin’s Creed formula, set it in a beautiful open world, but crucially they’ve also upgraded all the attention to detail. Origins feels like a genuinely authentic historical adventure.

I’m not saying it’s completely perfect. As glorious a world as it is, the experience of outrunning a sandstorm in the beautifully realised desert is counteracted by the 2D vegetation. I mean, are we really still in 2D-vegetation land? And the animation isn’t great when you compare it to something like Horizon Zero Dawn. The NPCs still have cone-clothing (you know, togas that stick out like solid cones so you can see their pants when they’re lying on the ground), and their faces lack a broad range of expression. Also, for such a huge and diverse world, the main and side missions are surprisingly short and lacking in diversity. To put it in perspective, it took me about ten days to complete ACO (all main and side missions and interest points), but it took me about three months to complete The Witcher 3 and Fallout 4. I know Assassin’s Creed is all about … well … assassinating, but there’s a real lack of diversity in side activities. They are pretty much all go to a location, stab someone or clear the place out, and collect a reward. It does get a shade tedious after a while, and I found myself sighing, “Oh, another Roman camp” upon approaching a question mark.

I think the most irritating aspect of this game is Aya (Bayek’s wife). I’ve no issue with her character per se. I love a female assassin and played Evie in Syndicate at any point where I had a choice who to play. My issue is that you spend hours and hours upgrading Bayek’s skills and equipment to the point where you think you can handle the big bosses at the end of the main storyline, only to find that you’re not playing Bayek at all. You have to play as Aya, who uses the least effective weapon in the game (IMHO), has no special skills or moves and because you rarely play as her character at any other point in the game, you really have no connection to her. This vexed me greatly. I know other people have raved about how wonderful the ending to ACO is, and I know it’s a great set up for previous and future episodes, but it really made me feel like all my efforts throughout the rest of the game were completely pointless. You literally cannot prepare or give yourself any advantage for the endgame fights. As a serious strategist, this is extremely frustrating.

Okay, gripes over. The improvements to the game almost entirely outweigh the flaws. I’m just going to say one word: Senu. I’ve never been so attached to an animal in a game as I am to this wonderful eagle. She adds a dynamic to AC gameplay that I’ve no idea how I’ve got along previously without. Not only can you see the layout of tricky restricted areas from above, but you can see the whole beautiful world from above. One of the best experiences is setting your mount to follow the road and then playing as Senu, watching yourself gallop across deserts and mountains from above while spying out which resources are heading your way. In fact, I found myself rarely fast travelling anywhere because racing through the world on horse- or camelback is such a rewarding experience in itself. I’d actually be excited to discover that my next mission was 9km away!

The other marvellous addition, or I should loss, for me at least, is the removal of those stupid additional tasks to get 100% sync on missions. I was never dexterous or calm enough to achieve any of those, so I rarely had the satisfaction of properly completing a mission. No more! I can actually feel like I’m achieving things in ACO, with or without flare. I thought I would miss the minimap, but actually it’s fine without it. The only thing I do miss is knowing when I’m about to step into a restricted area. Many a time I found myself charging into a pit of Roman soldiers completely unaware. I’m also grateful that the forays into the future (as Laila) are short and sweet. I personally detest being pulled out of great gameplay to go through these laborious future episodes that could quite frankly be done away with at no great loss, but Laila seems to be quite the assassin herself and has most of the moves.

I know I was a bit derisive about the side missions earlier on, but some of them are really very engaging. I really enjoyed the more era-appropriate missions like the stargazing and tomb raiding, ones where you have to use your brain a bit more to figure things out, rather than just hide-and-stab missions. I do love a good hide-and-stab (and I realise that’s the whole premise for Assassin’s Creed) but I’m just looking for a bit more diversity to keep my interests levels from dropping off. (On a side-mission side note, I will never finish this game 100% because they want me to kill elephants. I’m sorry, I simply can’t. I know it’s very historically relevant, but it just cuts a little near for me with the current state of elephant abuse in the world. They are highly intelligent and empathetic creatures, and I just won’t do it. I can kill all the humans on the planet, but I will not cut an abused elephant to death. Just no.)

So, all in all, Assassin’s Creed Origins is a huge success for the franchise. I will say it: it is the best Assassin’s Creed game yet. There, I said it. That doesn’t mean it is without flaws, but I am entirely optimistic that Ubisoft is heading in the right direction now. They lost their way a bit, but they listened to the players, they took time off to make sure their next offering was what we wanted and they have certainly delivered. From a longtime fan to a responsive developer: thank you, thank you, thank you.

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